Are these your end-of-life goals?

  • Do you want a timely and peaceful transition?
  • Do you want your family members to be free of conflict? For your passing to be private? For others to honor your dignity?
  • Do you want to avoid unbearable end-of-life pain and suffering?
  • Do you want avoid a prolonged dying in Advanced Dementia?

A request for CPR with NO Chest Compressions, if attempt begins within 4 min. (1:04)

An example of making your specific wishes clear on a video. Also, this is an option many people are NOT informed about, but may desire. It may be desired by older women who suffer from osteoporosis and have problems with their heart’s rhythm.

Three myths regarding Advance Care Planning:

1. “My spouse knows what I want.”
When “that time comes, “the person you trust now may not be willing, or available, or able to convince the opposition to honor your wishes (without your clear expression of your specific wishes).

2. “I already have a Living Will.”
Most Living Wills are NOT effective for Advanced Dementia. To be certain your future physician will provide the most aggressive treatment to relieve pain and suffering (if needed), you need to sign another form. Few people know they can have TWO Living Wills.

3. “I am at peace with my choice for DNR (Do Not Attempt to Resuscitate).”
Many people are not informed that they might survive an arrest but still avoid chest compressions; or that having a DNR order puts them at risk for being denied treatments they DO want; or that Living Wills put them at risk for not receiving resuscitation that they may still want.

Our mission:

Caring Advocates’ clinical, legal, and pastoral health care professionals are dedicated to help you…
learn your end-of-life options;
express your wishes strategically: and,
serve as your advocates so others DO honor your wishes.

  • Stanley A. Terman, PhD, MD—introduced by Karen Wyatt, MD, of End Of Life University (Feb, 2014)(2:39)

    Stanley A. Terman, Ph.D., M.D., founded this non-profit organization in 2000 and is its current CEO and Medical Director.


Dr. Terman not only advised my mother about her end-of-life options, he also made her feel secure that she would not have to opt for premature dying to avoid getting stuck in a miserable state like dementia or stroke, in which she could no longer ask for treatment to stop. He called this the “Ironclad Strategy.” I’ll never forget how peaceful I felt as the three of us were “together” as Mom died. I was by her side, holding the phone that now connected my sister to Mom. Without Dr. Terman’s help, I doubt my sister would have ever have been able to make peace with Mom or feel peace with herself after Mom died. She has. We both have. My mother was able to die peacefully in her own bed with the undivided attention of her two closest relatives—her daughters. Who would not want that? I am so grateful that I fortunately found Dr. Terman to help us all attain a peaceful transition.

Ellen C. from Pasadena